Let's Dance Tinikling

Tess IronsStarred Page By Tess Irons, 20th Feb 2012 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/25ehvm_l/
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>Culture>General

I was inspired to write this article in view of the forthcoming Multicultural celebration in our parish. This celebration is a gathering of all our parish members in recognition of our cultural diversity and ethnicity. Part of this is the presentation of one of the Philippines' native dances, the "Tinikling".

Origin of "Tinikling"

Tinikling is one of the most popular native dances in the Philippines. The name originates from the local bird specie tikling. This type of bird has long legs and neck. The birds are considered as the worst enemies of the farmers in the Visayan region because they molest the ricefields as they prey on the ripening rice grains. Because of this, farmers would place some traps made of bamboo to catch the annoying birds. But then, these birds would still manage to escape from the traps. The tinikling dance is a mimicry of the birds' grace and speed by skillfully maneuvering between large bamboo poles.

The Tinikling Dance

The Tinikling Dance originated in Leyte, in the Visayan islands of central Philippines. It involves two people hitting bamboo poles on the ground and against each other in coordination with one or more dancers who hop over and between the poles. The trick is to keep your feet from getting caught between the poles.

Teamwork between the clappers and the dancers is very important as they need to coordinate and synchronize their movements with each other. The teamwork involves being alert and in coordination with the speed, the beat, the rhythm, and the counting.

A few years ago when I took a trip to the Philippines, my family and I got the opportunity to see a cultural show featuring some of the country's native dances including the tinikling. It was worth watching it as you can see how skillful the performers are, and you will appreciate the unique quality of the dance.

In the United States, each time we have gatherings that involve Filipino participations, there is always a demand from the audience for the tinikling dance.

Filipino Celebrations

Last December at our Simbang Gabi (Evening Mass) celebrations, tinikling was performed at the reception. Aside from having the professional dancers perform, they also gave step lessons to those who would like to learn. It was fun and very interesting. The photo above shows Fr. Cal being given an instruction how to do the steps. He did very good and was able to learn the basic steps in just a few minutes.

Tinikling in Motion

Well, you won't really be able to appreciate Tinikling without actually seeing the dance in motion. So, here's your chance to see how it is done. I was lucky enough to be able to find something on You Tube that will best describe what this dance is all about.

Enjoy watching and have a good day! Please click this link to see the video


Image Credits:
en.wikipedia.org
likha.org
you tube

Tags

Bamboo Dance, Cultural Dance, Native Dance, Philippine National Dance, Philippines, Tess Irons, Tinikling, Tinikling Steps, Wikinut

Meet the author

author avatar Tess Irons
I love to write poems and essays.

I also write at:
http://expertscolumn.com
https://www.redgage.com

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Comments

author avatar Buzz
20th Feb 2012 (#)

What a very grand Pinoy article, Tess! It's a great Filipiniana share to the world, this native dance. Congrats on the STAR again!

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author avatar Tess Irons
20th Feb 2012 (#)

Thank you, Buzz. I'm getting homesick kasi that's why I wrote this article. I'm glad you like it.

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author avatar Jerry Walch
20th Feb 2012 (#)

Very interesting, Tess. Loved the video.

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author avatar Tess Irons
20th Feb 2012 (#)

I'm glad you liked it, Jerry. Thanks for the nice comment.

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author avatar Funom Makama
20th Feb 2012 (#)

Wow!~~~ Its so fascinating!

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author avatar Tess Irons
20th Feb 2012 (#)

Fascinating indeed, Funom. Thank you for your visit.

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author avatar Songbird B
20th Feb 2012 (#)

Great celebration and loved the video too Tess..A very dexterous dance indeed!

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author avatar Tess Irons
20th Feb 2012 (#)

Thanks, Songbird B. I wish I could dance Tinikling.

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author avatar avery sandiego
20th Feb 2012 (#)

Like it! thanks for sharing...I never had a chance to do tinikling in school...modern dance only....this dance is really about timing and to synchronize..if one does not want the feet to be caught

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author avatar Tess Irons
20th Feb 2012 (#)

Thanks, Averygirl. I have never tried Tinikling either. It would be nice to learn.

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author avatar Delicia Powers
20th Feb 2012 (#)

Very lovely article, thank you:0)

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author avatar Tess Irons
20th Feb 2012 (#)

Thanks, Delicia. I'm glad you enjoyed reading the article. I hope you watched the video too.

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author avatar Val Mills
21st Feb 2012 (#)

I really enjoyed reading this and learning something new. I had a parent come to school and teach the children the basics of this dance many years ago, but had no idea what it was called.

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author avatar Tess Irons
21st Feb 2012 (#)

Thanks for your comment, Van. I'm glad you enjoyed reading this article. I'm sure those children enjoyed the tinikling lessons.

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author avatar Jules, The Cowboy
21st Feb 2012 (#)

i will never dance tinikling..hahaha...baka ako maipit...not to mention na kahit yung tagahawak ng kawayan naiipit din..

thanks for presenting our culture Kabz

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author avatar Tess Irons
21st Feb 2012 (#)

Thanks, kabz. Given the opportunity, I will try learning as I've always admired tinikling. Besides, I like dancing.

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author avatar Jules, The Cowboy
21st Feb 2012 (#)

ang i experienced snaring tikling birds too

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author avatar AmosTheCat
24th Feb 2012 (#)

I have seen this at a the annual international student exhibition at the university where I worked. It is delightful to watch. Thank you.

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author avatar Tess Irons
24th Feb 2012 (#)

Thanks for reading this article and for watching the video, AmosTheCat. I'm sure you and eveyone in the university enjoyed watching it. I appreciate your comment.

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author avatar Denise O
4th Mar 2012 (#)

Oh what fun, we use to do this dance when I lived in Guam. Oh what lovely memories you have brought back to me. Congrats on the star page, it is well deserved. As always, thank you for sharing.:)

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author avatar Tess Irons
4th Mar 2012 (#)

Thanks, Denise. I'm glad you liked this article. That's true, Tinikling is also famous in Guam as there are so many Filipinos there. Have a great day. Hafaday! I'm not sure if I spelled that correctly.

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