Terrifying New Drug Yaba

tony leather By tony leather, 19th Apr 2012 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/2jstvkqe/
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>Culture>Social Trends

Twice as powerful as Ecstasy, this drug was developed in Germany, on the orders of Adolf Hitler to his German chemists. He wanted something that would keep his front line troops awake and alert for days on end.

Terrifying New Drug Yaba



There is a new youth culture springing up around the world, yet it’s not only the young who embrace it with open arms. Anything to escape from what people see as the awful reality of everyday life is welcome, but the fact that it could seriously damage, or shorten whatever life they might have seems unimportant.

Drugs are an all too popular answer to the boredom that they feel. Escapism on a grand scale, pushing themselves to their physical and emotional limits because it helps them to feel truly ‘alive’, but there’s a ‘new’ kid on the drugs block which makes all the others seem like aspirin, and it has a history to chill the blood.

Twice as powerful as Ecstasy, this drug was developed in Germany, on the orders of Adolf Hitler to his German chemists. He wanted something that would keep his front line troops awake and alert for days on end. They produced a drug derived from synthetic amphetamines, which included Lithium, salt, household cleaning products and cold remedies.

It was called Yaba, and its impact was enormous, even though it was highly hallucinogenic, and was thought to cause lung disorders, pulmonary and kidney lesions, heart attacks and extreme paranoia. Users typically suffer severe depression, and often try to commit suicide, yet Hitler’s soldiers were fed the stuff like sweets, and the formula for making it migrated to the Far East.

Increasingly popular in the Far East, Yaba is now, it is claimed by some, more popular in Thailand than heroin, and is a derivative of synthetic amphetamines such as speed. Yaba, though. can be manufactured much quicker and easier, various recipes spreading from the Far East via the Internet, and by word of mouth, though finding a consistent breakdown of ingredients is almost impossible.

There have been reports that Yaba is mostly methamphetamine, 80% pure with the cut often being castoffs from heroin production. These day, Shamboo, the other name for it, coming as tiny, brightly colored pills, is spread widely across Europe and is almost certainly on sale in the US. Users claim that it’s an even bigger ‘hit’ than E, and that they can party without food or sleep for up to four days after taking it. Experts believe it could soon be the drug of choice for clubbers.

In Thailand, the stuff was originally called ‘Ya Ma’, or horse medicine because people thought it gave them the strength of horses, and is now so popular that five times more of it is produced than Heroin. It is not like Ecstasy in one respect though, and is far from being a ‘recreational drug because at least one million Thai people are addicted to it.

So huge is the trade in this drug – at least two billion tablets are expected to be produced next year – that the manufacturers, hidden within the area called the ‘Golden Triangle’ actually have a 20,000 strong army, known as the United Wa State Army, UWSA for short. Headed by Wei Hsueh-kang, who is leader of the Wa ethnic group, this amy boasts some of the most sophisticated weaponry in the world.

Wei has put $1million dollar bounties on the heads of army units who are fighting him, and is now thought to be one of the most powerful drug lords in the world, so much so that the US government have offered a $2million dollar reward for his arrest. Not that they are squeaky clean themselves, when it comes to drug abuse.

At the same time as Hitler was having Yaba developed, LSD was discovered in Basle, Switzerland, on 19th April 1943 by Albert Hoffman, of the Sandoz pharmaceutical company. During the Cold War, the CIA ran an operation called ‘Midnight Climax’, establishing a brothel in San Francisco so that LSD could be tested on unwitting clients.

Between 1955 and 1964, tests were also forced on inmates of penitentiaries and mental hospitals, and Stansfield Turner – once head of the CIA – has admitted that that mind control research was done at over 80 institutions, including colleges and universities. Very few test subjects ever knew about it, and at least one recorded suicide happened as a direct result.

Yaba is lethal, in so many ways, and the Thai authorities – along with others in south-east Asia, are faced with an ever growing problem of mindless violence committed by users, especially in Laos and Myanmar, the two bordering countries that help form the ‘Golden Triangle’.

So addictive is it that people will go any lengths to get it, and vast sums are offered to those prepared to smuggle it. They can get 100,000 tablets in a rucksack, and up to 5,000 in a hollowed out shoe heel! When you consider that users happily pay $10 a pill – A REALLY cheap fix, and that the pills cost only cents to make – you can see why.

That’s why one village headman in the ‘Golden Triangle’ was able to buy himself not only a diamond Rolex and a luxury BMW, but also to build a supermarket, petrol station, and a huge European type mansion. He was also found to have to have 23 wives and over $2 million in his bank account, and this guy is a very minor player.

Yaba may well give users an incredible high, but the price they pay is awful. One of the most common hallucinogenic reactions are ‘crank bugs’ – users become convinced they have insects burrowing under their skin, and get hysterical in their attempts to scratch them out. Fights break out for no reason other than their sudden belief in their own invincibility, and many murders have been committed.

This ‘new kid’ drug is what the clubbers among the American youth are eagerly looking forward to trying, and in many respects it’s a terrifying prospect. It didn’t, in the end, help the Nazis to win the war, and it won’t help anybody else to live a better life. It’s just a vicious little pill that does far more harm than good.

Addiction to Yaba has sent crime figures soaring in Thailand and other Asian countries, so it’s fair to assume that it will have the same effect across the globe, as its makers push it further round world markets. Narcotics barons will already have earmarked the US as a major market for Shamboo, and that’s a worrying thought.

Users in Asia have a pet name for it over there, which seems oddly appropriate. They call it ‘crazy medicine’ and it’s easy to see why. You have to be crazy to take it, and you most certainly are when it’s in your bloodstream. There are so many less dangerous ways to have a real good time, so think it over. Would the experience of its effects on you really be worth the risk?

Tags

Addictive, Chemistry, Development, Drug, Ecstasy, Hitler, Wwii, Yaba

Meet the author

author avatar tony leather
mainly non-fiction articles, though I do write short stories, poetry and descriptive prose as well. Have been writing for over ten years now

Share this page

moderator Mark Gordon Brown moderated this page.
If you have any complaints about this content, please let us know

Comments

author avatar sarosh
20th Apr 2012 (#)

Nice one

Reply to this comment

author avatar Saiful
16th Sep 2012 (#)

Would like to know in details how to manufacture Yaba, from A to Z. Alternatively you can give some suggestion or reference email/web address. Thanks

Reply to this comment

author avatar Wow
30th Jan 2013 (#)

Methamphetamine, the psychoactive ingrediant in Ya Ba (thai for crazy drug) was not created by Adolf Hitler. It was synthesized by a japanese chemist in 1893.
Both sides of the wwII however did use this molecule for various combat applications. Ya Ba is not 80% methamphetamine cut with heroin by products but is rather around 30% methamphetamine and the remaining composing of caffeine and fillers.
I could go on and on, this article is riddled with inaccuracies.
If anyone would like to know more this is a good paper on the topic.
THE EMERGENCE OF METHAMPHETAMINE IN THAILAND: INTERVENTIONS AND TREATMENT
Anjalee Cohen and Catherine McGregor

Reply to this comment

Add a comment
Username
Can't login?
Password