A Brief Biography of Jackie Robinson, Plus his Horoscope

Steve KinsmanStarred Page By Steve Kinsman, 9th Sep 2011 | Follow this author | RSS Feed
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>Divination>Astrology

We take a look at the life and times of Jackie Robinson, as well as a glance at his horoscope.

His early life

Born Jack Roosevelt Robinson, in Cairo, Georgia on January 31, 1919, Jackie Robinson was the youngest of five children brought up by a single mother, who were raised in dire poverty, the descendants of sharecroppers. His brothers were Edgar, the oldest, then Frank, Matthew, nicknamed Mack (a silver medalist behind Jesse Owens in the 200 meter dash at the1936 Olympics), and Willa Mae. Jack's father abandoned the family in 1920, and his mother took them to live in Pasdadena, California, where she worked odd jobs to keep the family afloat.

Pasedena was an affluent, white community with very few minority families, thus Jackie and his minority friends were excluded from many activities, so he ended up joining a gang, but a friend of his, Cal Anderson, talked him out of remaining with the gang.

Jackie's older brother Matthew encouraged him to pursue his athletic talents. At John Muir High School Jackie played varsity football, basketball, baseball, track and tennis. In 1936 he won the junior boys singles championship in the annual Pacific Coast Negro Tennis Tournament and, from wikipedia..."earned a place on the Pomona annual baseball tournament all-star team, which included future Hall of Famers Ted Williams and Bob Lemon. In late January, 1937, the Pasadena Star newspaper reported that Robinson 'for two years has been the outstanding athlete at Muir, starring in football, basketball, track, baseball and tennis.'"

Pasadena Junior College and UCLA

At Pasadena Junior College Jackie played quarterback and safety on the football team, was the shortstop and leadoff hitter on the baseball team, broke all the school's records in the broad jump competing on the track team, and played guard for the school's basketball team. In 1938 he was elected to the All-Southland Junior College Team for baseball and selected the team's Most Valuable Player. That year he was one of ten students elected to the school's Order of the Mast and Dagger for "performing outstanding service to the school and whose scholastic and citizenship record is worthy of recognition."

Transferring to UCLA, Jackie became the first person in America to earn varsity letters in a single year in four different sports, football, basketball, baseball and track. At UCLA he met his futire wife, Rachel Isum.

Military career

Robinson was drafted in 1942 and assigned to a segregated Army cavalry unit at Fort Riley, Kansas. He applied for admission to Officer Candidate School, but because he was black his admission was delayed for several months. From wikipedia..."After protests by heavyweight boxing champion Joe Louis (then stationed at Fort Riley) Robinson was accepted into OCS. This common military experience spawned a personal friendship between Robinson and Louis. Robinson was commisioned a second lieutenant in January 1943."

On July 6, 1944, Jackie boarded a bus at Fort Riley with another officer's wife and was ordered by the driver to move to the rear of the bus. Robinson flatly refused, and the driver backed down, but after reaching the end of the line he summoned military police. Robinson was arrested. After complaining of the racist questioning by the investigating officer, Robinson was court-martialed, charged with public drunkenness (he never drank) and multiple other charges. Robinson was subsequently acquitted of all charges by an all-white military panel.

Baseball career

In 1945 the Boston Red Sox held a tryout for Robinson and a few other black players at Fenway Park, but the tryout was a farce, a publicity stunt designed to assuage the complaints of a Boston city councilman. Robinson was humiliated, and fourteen years later the Red Sox were the last team in the major leagues to integrate.

In the mid-forties, Branch Rickey, owner of the Brooklyn Dodgers, began to scout the Negro leagues for black talent. Rickey selected Robinson from a list of prominent black talent and interviewed him for possible assignment to the Dodger's minor league team in Montreal. On October 23, 1945, Jackie Robinson formally signed a contract to play for the Montreal Royals. From wikipedia...."In what was later referred to as 'The Noble Experiment', Robinson was the first black baseball player in the International League since the 1880's."

Jackie Robinson was called up to the majors six days before the start of the 1947 season and played his first game at the first base position and subsequently became the team's starting second baseman. However, much racial tension existed on the Dodger team, and some Dodger players said they would sit out the games if Robinson played. Manager Leo Durocher told the team "I do not care if the guy is yellow or black, or if he has stripes like a fuckin' Zebra. I'm the manager of this team, and I say he plays. What's more, he can make us all rich. And if any of you can't use the money, I will see that you are all traded."

Robinson was mercilessly taunted by opposing players. Philadelphia Phillies players called Robinson a "nigger" from their dugout, a move Rickey said "did more than anybody to unite the Dodgers. When (they) poured out that string of unconscionable abuse, (they) solidified and united thirty men." Pee Wee Reese, the Dodger shortstop who hailed form Kentucky, came to Robinson's defense, saying "you can hate a man for many reasons. Color is not one of them." When Cincinnati Red's fans screamed hateful things at Jackie, Reese took a stand. He walked over to second base from his shortstop position and put his arm around Robinson's shoulder. The crowd grew silent. "This man is my teammate and my brother," he was announcing to the world. That year Robinson hit 12 home runs, stole a league-leading 29 bases and was named Rookie of the Year. In 1949 he batted .342 and was named the league's Most Valuable Player. In his ten-year career Robinson helped the Dodgers win four pennants and a World Series championship, while ringing up a lifetime batting average of .311. Robinson also stole home twelve times in his career, setting an all-time major league record that is unlikely ever to be broken. He was inducted as the first black man into baseball's Hall of Fame five years after his retirement in his first year of eligibilty. Major League Baseball permanently retired his number, 42, in 1978.

After baseball

After leaving baseball, Jackie Robinson became the first African-American to head a major U. S. corporation when he was named president of Chock Full O' Nuts Coffee. He also was very active in the civil rights movement, marching with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in the march to Selma, Alabama. Robinson contracted diabetes after his baseball career and died at the age of 53. This great human being, a man of consummate grace and dignity, was one of the great icons of the twentieth century.

His horoscope

With Leo rising, Jackie Robinson was loaded with self-assurance and self-confidence, and he was comfortable living his life on the public stage (Leo). Saturn in conjunction with his ascendant rendered him very responsible and mature and filled him with great self-discipline. This conjunction also enabled him to withstand with quiet dignity the racial abuse heaped upon him as the first black player in the major leagues.

An exact New Moon conjunction of the Sun and Moon is an indicator of leading life as a pioneer, one who does something completely new with his life. What he pioneered, of course, was a new construct in American society: blacks and whites playing baseball together on the diamonds of the major leagues. In Aquarius, the conjunction revealed him to be socially adept and secure within himself. In the sixth house, it endowed him with a tremendous work (sixth house) ethic. The presence of Mars on one of the four angles of his horoscope, opposing his ascendant, gave him his tremendous athletic abilitiy. Moreover, four planets in Aquarius and Jupiter and Pluto in the eleventh house made him fiecely independent, very popular, and also fueled him with a passionate commitment to social justice. Six planets in 'fixed' signs, along with both his ascendant and mid-heaven, endowed him with great determination and persistence.

Jackie Robinson was the perfect man to integrate major league baseball, and Branch Rickey's selection of him to be the first to do it was a stroke of pure genius.

Color photo from photobucket
All others from wikimedia commons

Tags

Aquarius, Astrology, Baseball, Biography Jackie Robinson Biography, Civil Rights, Horoscope, Jackie Robinson, Major Leagues, Star Signs, Steve Kinsman, Zodiac, Zodiac Signs

Meet the author

author avatar Steve Kinsman
I live in California with my wife Carol, where I have been practicing professional astrology for 35 years. I write articles on astrology, but I enjoy writing on a variety of other subjects as well..

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Comments

author avatar Mark Gordon Brown
9th Sep 2011 (#)

I am sure athletics must have been one of the only ways out of poverty for blacks at that time.
A shame he died so young

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author avatar Pink&Blue
9th Sep 2011 (#)

Great article as always Steve

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author avatar Steve Kinsman
9th Sep 2011 (#)

Thank you Crystal.

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author avatar Sam Bralley
9th Sep 2011 (#)

Really good read, Steve. Very well written and interesting...

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author avatar Steve Kinsman
9th Sep 2011 (#)

Thank you Sam. I appreciate that.

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author avatar Sheila Newton
10th Sep 2011 (#)

Being British - and not getting baseball coverage over here so much - I'd not heard of Jackie Robinson. But what an athlete! WOW!

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author avatar Steve Kinsman
10th Sep 2011 (#)

He was a truly gifted athlete, excelling at every sport he tried, but more importantly he stands out as one of the truly important figures in the civil rights struggle for black equality.

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author avatar Retired
10th Sep 2011 (#)

As usual, a well penned and finely presented bio and chart-findings with great photos, too. Bravo on another well deserved star. :-)

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author avatar Steve Kinsman
10th Sep 2011 (#)

You are just too, too kind rd. Thank you.

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author avatar Buzz
10th Sep 2011 (#)

Thanks, Steve, for this piece. Beautifully presented.

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author avatar Buzz
10th Sep 2011 (#)

Thanks, Steve, for this piece. Beautifully presented.

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author avatar Steve Kinsman
10th Sep 2011 (#)

Thank you Buzz. Much appreciated.

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author avatar M G Singh
10th Sep 2011 (#)

Very interesting. You amze me.

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author avatar Steve Kinsman
10th Sep 2011 (#)

Thank you Madan, and you amaze me.

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author avatar Delicia Powers
11th Sep 2011 (#)

Amazing history, thank you for another beautiful page Steve:0)

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author avatar Steve Kinsman
11th Sep 2011 (#)

Amazing man, Jackie Robinson. Thank you Delicia.

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author avatar kaylar
12th Sep 2011 (#)

very good bio...

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author avatar Steve Kinsman
12th Sep 2011 (#)

Thank you kaylar.

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author avatar Carol Kinsman
13th Sep 2011 (#)

A great article on a remarkable human being. Thanks for sharing this Steve. Well done! xoxo

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author avatar Steve Kinsman
13th Sep 2011 (#)

He was indeed a very remarkable man. Thank you my love. xoxo

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author avatar Neha Dwivedi
13th Sep 2011 (#)

great share Steve!

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author avatar Steve Kinsman
13th Sep 2011 (#)

Thank you very much geeta.

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author avatar Songbird B
1st Oct 2011 (#)

What a great Star page, and an interesting history of an exceptional man who rose up despite all the odds..Great work as always Steve..You bring these people to life for us..\0/x

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author avatar Steve Kinsman
1st Oct 2011 (#)

Thank you so much Songbird.

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author avatar Shamarie
25th Sep 2015 (#)

This is an exceptional article for an exceptional athlete and human being. Thanks for sharing, Steve! It is one of the best tributes to Jackie Robinson!

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author avatar Steve Kinsman
25th Sep 2015 (#)

Thank you Shamarie. I really appreciate that.

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