A Computer, Components to Components

rafiyantoStarred Page By rafiyanto, 17th Aug 2015 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/35ued9z2/
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>Technology>Computer Hardware

First of all, congratulations on your interest in wanting to build your own PC! I remember how excited I was when I really began to get into it

A Computer, Components to Components

Lets get started with everything you need to know about the hardware of a computer.If you hate digging through information when you only want to know the basics, then this article is for.

The Parts:
Case
Power Supply
Motherboard
CPU (Central Processing Unit)
Memory
Video Card
Storage (Hard Drive)
Optical Drive (CD ROM/DVD ROM)


Explained

Case

Case - The computer case is what all the glory goes into. All of your parts will be inside the case, which provides protection for your components. Case are generally designed to intake air (by fans) from the bottom, and exhaust through the top at the back of the case. This is called "Air-Flow" and is a must with any computer build, or else your parts will get too hot. When components get too hot they either die, or it will shorten the lifespan of the part significantly in a lot of builds. Finding the right case is an important step in building a computer and should not be overlooked.

Power Supply

Power Supply - The power supply, also known as the PSU (Power Supply Unit), is what transmits the electrical power from your wall outlet in order to give power to all of it's parts. Depending on the case, they can be either mounted on the top or bottom of the case. The power supply plays no role whatsoever in determining how well your PC will perform. For example, you do not get any gain in speed/performance when swapping out a 500w for a 1000w. All it means is that if computer A has certain parts (like a faster/better CPU) that require more power to run than computer B, then the 1000w power supply is more suitable for computer A in order to maintain a consistent power draw for each part to function properly. What happens if you put the 500w power supply in computer A? A nuclear meltdown! Kidding. Your computer will more than likely crash, not boot up, or have distortions and artificats come up on screen. On the other hand, putting a 1000w in computer B is more than okay, as it provides more than enough head room (power wise) to power all of it's parts.

Motherboard

Motherboard - The motherboard is kind of like the human body. It ties all of the pieces together and allows each connected componment to perform it's proper function. All of your other components will be connected to the motherboard in some fashion. Motherboards are usually categorized by their 'form factor'. The form factor is the industry standard in which the motherboard was specifically designed for. The size, shape, and layout are what determine a motherboards form factor. So if you buy an ATX motherboard, you will want to buy an ATX case to ensure that the motherboard will fit properly inside the case. Their are also mATX or 'micro atx' motherboards that are considerably smaller than full sized ATX boards. A full sized ATX motherboard will not inside of a mATX computer case. However a mATX motherboard should in most cases fit inside of a full sized ATX case. I will also note that the concern of 'how will all of my parts fit perfectly if I buy them all separately?' was one of my biggest discouragements when it came to having a desire to build computers. I always thought, 'it will never go as planned'. In other words, I imagined that maybe there were 100 or 200 form factors that existed and I was sure to mess something up along the way. Well I'm happy to inform you that the two form factors listed above (ATX and mATX) are the ONLY ONES used 95% of the time when building a computer yourself or buying it in a store. This simplifies things when you are shopping for parts. I wish someone had told me that sooner.

CPU (Central Processing Unit)

CPU (Central Processing Unit) - The Central Processing Unit plays a big part in a computers speed and ability to multitask, as well as gaming. The unit itself is covered underneath the CPU heat-sink, which is needed in order to keep the unit at reasonable temperatures. Most new CPU's will come with a provided heat sink. The two big brands who make CPU's are AMD and Intel. With my experience and evaluation, Intel has a better track record, but they are more expensive. With that said, the CPU will probably be the most expensive part of your computer, unless you buy a really powerful graphics card.

Memory

Memory - The memory or 'RAM' (Random Access Memory) acts as a temporary storage space where information needs to be accessed very very quickly. The RAM sticks or 'modules' usually come in 1GB, 2GB, 4GB and 8GB modules. Most PC builders, including myself, would recommend to NEVER mix and match different RAM sizes and different brands together. In simple terms, if you decide to buy lets say, two sticks of RAM, make SURE ram stick A and ram stick B are the same brand and size. So it would be okay to buy lets say, a 2GB Corsair RAM stick with another 2GB Corsair RAM stick. What you want to avoid is, pairing a 2GB Corsair RAM stick with a 4GB Corsair RAM stick, or a 2GB Corsair RAM stick with a 2GB Kingston RAM stick. In case you didn't guess, Corsair and Kingston are brands of RAM. Either of the last two cases is a no no when building a PC. In the example above, two 2GB RAM sticks (4GB total), is more than enough for a standard PC build, and even a gaming build.

Video Card

Video Card - The video card, or graphics card, is the part that powers all of the visual graphic display that your computer presents to you on your monitor. The two most popular video card brands are Nvidia and AMD. Nvidia has a slightly better track record as far as drivers go. Drivers are updates/improvements that Nvidia or AMD allow you to download to improve your video cards capabilities. With Nvidia, expect to pay a higher price tag for a graphics card that offers the same performance as it's AMD counterpart. Personally I've had my best experiences with Nvidia. To play the latest modern day PC games (the ones at the time this article was written), you will need one of the pricier cards. For about $150 you can get a video card that can play most demanding games at lower settings. By settings I mean the settings inside the games options, which allow you to tweak the quality of the graphics. With lower graphics settings you will experience less 'lag' and smoother gameplay. 'Lag' is a term used to describe a game when it is performing poorly, and usually is used to describe any stuttering and jerkyness when you're playing a game. In most cases, any lag that while gaming usually means that the video card is not powerful enough to run the game you are playing. The downside to lowering the graphics settings of course is that the game won't look as nice. If you want to be done with it and simply buy the most powerful card to this day, then you will be buying a Nvidia Geforce GTX 680. It will cost you around $500 and will be able to play the latest games on the higher graphics settings, all while running nice and smooth with minimal lag. Get at least a 500w power supply if you intend on getting that graphics card.

Storage (Hard Drive)

Storage (Hard Drive) - In order to hold all of it's data, your computer is going to need storage. This part of the computer is specficially designed to contain every piece of information including every file, every program/application, the operating system, and so on. A newer type of storage device has become quite popular in recent years, and those are Solid State Drives or SSD's. These are considerably faster than your typical hard drive. A hard drive, or HHD (Hard Disk Drive), has physical parts/disks that physically have to move in order to perform it's function. A Solid State Drive stores it's information on a memory type called 'Flash', that has no moving parts and allows information to be gathered/accessed much quicker. A simple example: Think of a Hard Disk Drive as your standard personal CD player. And think of a Solid State Drive as a modern day iPod or any MP3 player. If you're familiar with CD players then you have an idea of how they work (or don't work). Sometimes they skip and take a second to kick in, they make audible noises (which is the disc spinning), and are sometimes slow to load the songs you desire to play. An MP3 player on the other hand performs it's tasks almost instantaneously, and doesn't have to go through all the steps that a CD player has to go through in order to operate. The same concept applies to Hard Drives and Solid State Drives. The primary attribute you will notice when you're computing is load times. Loading applications, games, start up time, shut down time, are much, much faster. Many have claimed that an SSD upgrade is the best upgrade for anyone to get for their computer. The only downside to SSD's is that they are much more expensive and are typically much smaller in storage size compared to a Hard Drive. To save money, a lot of people like to buy a small 60GB designated SSD to install the operating system on which greatly increases start up times and shut downs. If you plan on putting games on an SSD I would recommend no less than a 120GB SSD . As you can imagine, putting games onto an SSD will allow the game to load much faster. For example, a great game to put on an SSD is Dragon Age: Orgins, because traveling to different areas in the game requires a brief loading screen. Well, with an HDD this loading sometimes isn't so 'brief'. With an SSD you will forget that those load screens even exist.

Optical Drive (CD ROM/DVD ROM)

Optical Drive (CD ROM/DVD ROM) - Lastly, we'll end on the most simple piece of hardware you will need. The optical drive, also known as DVD-ROM Drives. They are also called DVD Burners. DVD burning is the task which allows you to a physical copy of an existing disc, whether it be a CD or DVD. Bluray is the newest optical drive format that I won't get into in this article. Most people will find that a DVD-ROM Drive meets all of their needs. They are what you will use to put information from the disc onto the computers hard drive itself.

First of all, congratulations on your interest in wanting to build your own PC! I remember how excited I was when I really began to get into it



All Picture in This Article Source by: Google.com

Check my Other Article:
Different Type of Computer (My First Star Page)
How to Watch Satellite Computer TV Programs
Problems with Acer Laptops
Windows Hard disk Failure and Recovery
Impress A Girl With Massage To Make Her Orgasm

Tags

Building Computer, Components, Computer, Hardisk, Hardware, Personal Computer

Meet the author

author avatar rafiyanto
I was a young man who likes new things, receipts for the media to learn, communicate and get the information I need

Share this page

moderator Steve Kinsman moderated this page.
If you have any complaints about this content, please let us know

Comments

author avatar rafiyanto
18th Aug 2015 (#)

Thank you so much steve, for approved my article :)

Reply to this comment

author avatar Sivaramakrishnan A
18th Aug 2015 (#)

Thanks for this clear explanation, images and tips, Rafiyanto - siva

Reply to this comment

author avatar rafiyanto
19th Aug 2015 (#)

siva: ur welcome sir :)

Reply to this comment

Add a comment
Username
Can't login?
Password