Be Organized and Prepared in a Home or Car Emergency

MarilynDavisatTIERS By MarilynDavisatTIERS, 16th Oct 2013 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/2l5rfbb4/
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>Emergency Preparedness>First Aid

Accidents take us by surprise. Each of us has had a kitchen accident, bruised ourselves, or had a child scrape a knee. Some of us have been in serious car accidents. It’s comforting to know how to be prepared for these types of emergencies

Know Where Your Supplies Are

Keeping a well-stocked first aid kit helps you respond quickly to common emergencies, stock one for your home and one for your car.

Each member of your family should be aware of where the kit is stored. Alert your babysitter where you keep your kit. Be sure you have all emergency numbers available to them.

When Elders Live in the House

Many seniors have moved in with their grown children. This means that there might be an emergency; requiring them to call a Fire Department or Emergency Medical Transport.

Be sure that you have these numbers in your kit as well, and explain to all children how to call 911 if Grandpa or Grandma will not wake up.

Storing Your Kit

Storing your kits out of reach of small children is best. There are varieties of containers you can use. I prefer a plastic box with snap down lids that can be stacked, made by Snap Ware. It is durable, see-through and light-weight and with the handle, I can take it outside if one of the grand kids is stung by a bee or falls into the rose bush. I also use one for a home sewing box, because losing a button can be just as much of an emergency when you are trying to get out the door.

Red Cross Recommendations

The Red Cross recommends that all first aid kits for a family of four include the following:

• 1 adhesive cloth tape (10 yards x 1 inch)
• 1 blanket (space blanket)
• 1 bottle hydrogen peroxide
(visit site to find out about the many uses of hydrogen peroxide)
• 1 breathing barrier (with one-way valve)
• 1 instant cold compress
• 1 roller bandage (3 inches wide)
• 1 roller bandage (4 inches wide)
• 2 absorbent compress dressings (5 x 9 inches)
• 2 hydrocortisone ointment packets (approximately 1 gram each)
• 2 packets of aspirin (81 mg each)
• 2 pair of non-latex gloves (size: large)
• 2 triangular bandages
• 25 adhesive bandages (assorted sizes)
• 5 antibiotic ointment packets (approximately 1 gram)
• 5 antiseptic wipe packets
• 5 sterile gauze pads (3 x 3 inches)
• 5 sterile gauze pads (4 x 4 inches)
• First aid instruction booklet
• Oral thermometer (non-mercury/non-glass)
• Scissors
• Tweezers

I also have my flashlight and extra batteries in the box as well as emergency candles, matches and lighters. It just helps keep me organized. You can buy all of these from a drug store, big box store, or buy the items online.

Medications

• Activated charcoal – only with advice from Poison Control
• Aloe Vera gel
• Anti-diarrhea medication
• Over-the-counter oral antihistamine, such as Benadryl
• Aspirin and non-aspirin pain relievers
• Sunscreen
• Emergency space blanket
• Calamine lotion
• Over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream
• Personal medications that don't need refrigeration: be mindful of refill and expiration dates
• If prescribed by your doctor, drugs to treat an allergic attack, such as an auto-injector like EpiPen
• Syringe, medicine cup or spoon

Emergency Releases

When I was seventeen, I was involved in a serious motorcycle accident with a head injury. Of course, there were no cell phones at that time, however, the individual I was riding with was conscious and told the police how to contact my parents. They were four hours away, but the injuries were severe enough to warrant surgery with only their verbal consent.

Having Permission to Receive Medical Attention or Services, signed by each family member, or in the case of small children, parents’ permission is practical and may be life saving. You will need to inquire online about your state’s laws concerning this form.

Have a medical history form for each family member – this can be an attachment to the Permission to Receive Medical Attention form or a separate document. This type of documentation can prevent additional emergency medical issues if you and your family is involved in a car accident and unconscious.

It is vital to have this with you in case of allergies, or other conditions that might hamper emergency medical attention.

Important Phone Numbers - Cell Phones Do Not Always Work

I have friends who are emergency responders. Too often an injured individual will state that their important numbers are in their phone. My friends have talked about the damaged phone not being of any help, and then the person losing consciousness so they are also unable to provide any medical or family information.

Keep these numbers in your Car First Aid Kit

• Emergency phone numbers of relatives or friends
• Phone numbers for your primary doctor or pediatrician
• Phone number for your pharmacy
• First-aid instruction manual

Check Your Kit Quarterly and Update as Items are Used

Make sure that all medications are current; your flashlight is working, and if you have to replace a battery in it, replace the used batteries with another. Check your lighter as well. The Red Cross also offers First-Aid courses, both in person and on-line.

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Tags

Accidents At Home, First Aid Kit For Car, First Aid Kit For Home, First Aid Kits To Make For Home And Car, Home Emergencies, Organized First Aid Kit

Meet the author

author avatar MarilynDavisatTIERS
A Certified Addiction Recovery Empowerment Specialist, with 25 years of abstinence-based recovery. I write about addictions, recovery, life lessons and general writing tips.

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author avatar MarilynDavisatTIERS
16th Oct 2013 (#)

Good afternoon, Mark; thank you for moderating this page. ~Marilyn

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author avatar Connie McKinney
16th Oct 2013 (#)

Marilyn, these are some very helpful tips. The cell phone one is a great tip. Often what happens with car accidents is that the phones fly out of the car or just out of reach of someone who is injured. Thanks for sharing.

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author avatar MarilynDavisatTIERS
16th Oct 2013 (#)

Good evening, Connie. I know I had not thought about it until my friends talked about it; like so many other conversations, got me thinking about how I could handle the situation, and then realized that all that info needed to be written down. I must confess, I do not go anywhere without pen and notebook - I never know when I'll get an idea for a page, or need to jot something down, and electronics just don't always work for me. ~Marilyn

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author avatar cnwriter..carolina
16th Oct 2013 (#)

very good tips these...thank you...

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author avatar MarilynDavisatTIERS
16th Oct 2013 (#)

Good evening, Carolina; thanks. I gave my grand daughter one when she got her first car the other month. It is practical and I feel better knowing she has it at 17. ~Marilyn

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author avatar Jerry Walch
16th Oct 2013 (#)

Great article. Very good list of supplies and medications.

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author avatar MarilynDavisatTIERS
17th Oct 2013 (#)

Good evening, Jerry. Thank you. ~Marilyn

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author avatar Phyl Campbell
17th Oct 2013 (#)

Excellent advice! I keep my phone number written in the lid of my son's lunchbox. If he freaks out and needs to call me, he can open the lid instead of trying to remember the number.

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author avatar MarilynDavisatTIERS
17th Oct 2013 (#)

Good evening, Phyl; I like that idea. Thanks for the comments. ~Marilyn

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author avatar Jerry Walch
17th Oct 2013 (#)

What? Your son doesn't have you on speed dial, Phyl? Only kidding.

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author avatar Stella Mitchell
17th Oct 2013 (#)

I do have a medical box in my car Marilyn , but I shall have to check what is in it again .
Bless you for such valuable advice .
Stella ><

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author avatar MarilynDavisatTIERS
17th Oct 2013 (#)

Good morning, Stella. I just like inventories - personal and medical, I guess, but making it a quarterly task means I can see what I have on hand; need to replace, or what is outdated and discard. Then I take a trip knowing I'm somewhat prepared. :) ~Marilyn

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author avatar Michelle Stanley
18th Oct 2013 (#)

I have a medical kit that needs to be refilled. Just reading this informative article made me realize I need to do it asap. I learned a few things, such as leaving emergency #'s in the kit, and making an inventory list. My son memorized my cell #, and I now need a kit for the car. Thanks Marilyn, for writing this very useful article. Michelle

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author avatar MarilynDavisatTIERS
18th Oct 2013 (#)

Good evening, Michelle. You are welcome; glad it was helpful. ~Marilyn

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author avatar M G Singh
18th Oct 2013 (#)

Sane advice

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author avatar MarilynDavisatTIERS
18th Oct 2013 (#)

Good morning, Madan; thanks for the comment. As a recovering addict, to have someone reference what I write as sane is the ultimate compliment. :) ~Marilyn

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author avatar Rose*
19th Nov 2013 (#)

Great article. I would keep some money in the emergency kit - eg a ten dollar bill - you might need it to get a taxi to the hospital for example

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author avatar MarilynDavisatTIERS
19th Nov 2013 (#)

Good morning, Rose; what an excellent idea, thank you so much for adding that. ~Marilyn

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