Civil War: Eruption of Violent Conduct

Crashnibbles By Crashnibbles, 12th Feb 2011 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/1pebd_tq/
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>History

This article is about the growing role of violence in the Civil War Era.

Violence

This is about the events that were right before the Civil War. This is a reference to 1850-1860. There will also be some other things, but it will focus in on there.

The Union had been on the verge of implosion around the issues of sectionalism since around 1820. There were many issues, and slavery was one of the biggest. This all lead to the North and South being almost two separate worlds. The compromises started in 1820. This was when the US (until Part III of this series, the Union and US refer to the same thing, which included the Civil War Era Union and Confederacy) had purchased a whole lot of land in the form of the Louisiana Purchase. Somebody helped by making a line somewhere through it and allowing slavery south of the line while abolishing it north of the line. This was called the Missouri Compromise, because it was made when Missouri applied for statehood, and Maine had to be added as well to avoid an imbalance in free and slave states.

Then things were all cool until the Mexican-American War. This gave the US the rest of the land to the Pacific. By then abolition had started to grow, and so had sectionalism. First, you should know that just because a lot of citizens were opposed to slavery, many of them still didn’t believe that all races were equal. There were some legal questions on the issue of slavery in the Union. This lead to a new compromise being needed for maintained peace. The compromise came in 1850. The Compromise of 1850 had 5 parts to it. Firstly, it added California as a free state. Secondly, it divided the Mexican Cession into territories. Thirdly, it ended the D.C. slave trade. Fourthly, the Compromise of 1850 enforced a much stricter fugitive slave law, making it highly illegal to help runaway slaves. Fifthly and finally, it ended a border dispute between Texas and New Mexico.

Then yet another compromise was needed. In 1854, the Kansas-Nebraska Act split the territory of Kansas into the territories of Kansas and Nebraska. Then things started heating up in Kansas. This was because popular sovereignty, or majority rules, would be used to decide whether the state would be free or slaveholding. This caused abolitionists and slaveholders to start killing each other in order to get the state to have less of the opposite side. This was referred to as Bleeding Kansas, because over 200 people were killed from the sectionalism.

Not everybody was an extremist, or an abolitionist or somebody agreeing with slavery and thinking that it was morally correct. There were also moderates. They had a position, but usually wouldn’t feel very strongly about it. In 1854 the Republican Party was born from a lot of people from Democrats, Whigs, and former Free-Soilers, a short-lived antislavery party. Abraham Lincoln was elected in 1860. This shouldn’t have actually happened, but the Democratic Party had split into 3 different sub-parties; they were North, South, and compromisers. When the South saw that the Republican Party had put an “abolitionist” (Who was against slavery, but not on board for total integration and equal rights) in the Whitehouse, they started to secede. This lead to Part III of the Civil War where the bullets began flying.

Here are some of my other Civil War articles!

http://socyberty.com/history/the-civil-war-combat-begins-and-ends/

http://socyberty.com/issues/the-civil-war-conflict-takes-up-names-and-arms/

http://socyberty.com/history/the-civil-wars-origins/

Tags

Civil War, North, Slavery, South, Violence

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author avatar richardpeeej
9th May 2011 (#)

A lovely share of history my friend, I never knew of these events and thank you for sharing freely...

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