Feline Diabetes: Part Five All About Insulin

Jerry WalchStarred Page By Jerry Walch, 19th Feb 2011 | Follow this author | RSS Feed
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>Pets>Cats

Einstein once said, “I have no special talent. I am only passionately curious.” I have no specific talent when it comes to veterinarian medicine but being a concerned pet owner I am passionately curious about it, and I follow my curiosity. I want to learn as much about veterinarian medicine as possible, so I can provide my furry companions with the best care possible. All pet parents are that way.

Types of Insulin Used For Feline Diabetes.

There was a time when most veterinarians prescribed Humulin (Human-based) insulin for treating feline diabetes but not today. Feline insulin vary in how they are made and how they act in the body. Feline insulin is generally classified by how fast they act in the body. Generally insulin are divided into three classes, “regular” or fairly fast acting; “lente” or slow-acting; and “ultrlente” or very slow-acting. All insulin dosages are measured in units, but the dosages are not comparable i.e 6-units of PZ1 is not equal to 6-units of Humulin or Caninsulin. Insulin is made from many sources with beef and pork being most common in veterinarian insulin.

Handle Insulin With Care

Always read the instructions that come with the insulin. Some insulin come as premixed suspensions while others come as a powder and dilutent and have to be mixed before using. Different insulin have different storage requirements. Some have to be stored at room temperature while other have to be store in the refrigerator. It is a excellent idea to avoid temperature extremes, extreme low temperatures and extreme high temperatures. Keep all insulin out of the sun. Handle all insulin gentally, shaking them will cause the delicate powder to separate from the dilutent. The violent shaking will also cause microscopic air bubbles to form which will cause your furry buddy harm. Extreme cold, freezing, will make the insulin inactive.

Always Mix Well Before Using

The powder settles quickly out of the dilutent, so always mix it before using it. To mix the insulin, roll the vial back and forth slowly between your palms, tipping it slightly as you roll it back and forth. An alternative method of mixing it is to hold the vial between thumb and forefinger and tip it upside down several time. A properly mixed insulin will have an uniform cloudy color.

Useful Life of Insulin.

Be cognizant of the expiration date on the vials and do not use the insulin beyond that date.

In Part Six, we will take a closer look at syringes and how to give an injection.


Related articles:
Feline Diabetes: Part One
Feline Diabetes: Part Two
Feline Diabetes: Part Three
Feline Diabetes: Part Four

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Tags

Cat, Cat Care, Cat Health, Cats, Diabetes, Diabetes Treatment, Diabetic, Diabetic Cat, Diabetic Dog, Diabetic Dogs, Feline, Feline Diabetes, Insulin, Insulin For Diabetes

Meet the author

author avatar Jerry Walch
Jerry Walch is a 71 year old freelance writer for hire living in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He has been writing since the late 1970s, and writes for both the print and online media. He specializes in

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Comments

author avatar Mark Gordon Brown
19th Feb 2011 (#)

I dont remember if I mentioned it on one of your other articles, my parents in law had a diabetic cat, at first he needed one shot a day, then two... it is not all that uncommon and something cat owners need to be aware of.

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author avatar Jerry Walch
19th Feb 2011 (#)

No Mark, I don't believe you mentioned that before. Good point. At the rate this series is progressing there will be at least two or three more parts before I'm finished with it.

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author avatar Retired
19th Feb 2011 (#)

Useful information...if I ever have a cat with feline diabetes, I will know where to look on how to take care of them.

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author avatar Jerry Walch
19th Feb 2011 (#)

Thanks Devoted.

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author avatar James R. Coffey
19th Feb 2011 (#)

There is sooooo much to know about his subject, Jerry. I'll have to keep these articles in a file--just in case!

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author avatar Carol
19th Feb 2011 (#)

Thanks for this information. Our cat died in 2009 aged 21, we hope to get another next year,and if it gets diabetes, this article will certainly help.

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author avatar muthusamy
21st Feb 2011 (#)

The facts presented is unique and interesting. I am a beginner. However i am writing at Triond and AC. Nice meeting

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author avatar Martin King
21st Feb 2011 (#)

Thanks for sharing Jerry

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author avatar Denise O
21st Feb 2011 (#)

Jerry, I just can't say enough how much I appreciate you doing this series, I know it is for cats but, it also fits right into caring for a diabetic dog. Insulin is a huge thing to follow up on. We used the same insulin for over 5 years, then they stopped making it. We then got a new insulin and it was much stronger, our vet never told us this, never had us changed Max's dose and his sugar crashed, this was the one that finally took him. So true, read all you can folks! Great job as always my friend.
Thank you for sharing.:)

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author avatar Retired
22nd Feb 2011 (#)

Jerry, i do not think that i will ever come across one of your articles and not like it. They are always well written and provide outstanding info.

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author avatar Angelique Newman
25th Feb 2011 (#)

You've written another well informed article Jerry and most likely they aided many felines out there whose owners read these great articles :)

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author avatar Jerry Walch
26th Feb 2011 (#)

Thank you one and all

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author avatar Tranquilpen
4th Mar 2011 (#)

Thanks Jerry, very informative .

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author avatar Greenfaol
5th Mar 2011 (#)

Brilliant and informative. I had no idea insulin became inactive when frozen. Wonder if this is the case for people insulin!!
Great read :D

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author avatar Jerry Walch
5th Mar 2011 (#)

The same thing applies to human insulin.

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author avatar Blossom S
10th Mar 2011 (#)

I went to a local surgery and saw the insulin pen ads everywehre.

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author avatar Jerry Walch
10th Mar 2011 (#)

My wife uses the insulin pens but I haven't seen them for pets.

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