Feline Diabetes: Part two The Initial Diagnosis

Jerry WalchStarred Page By Jerry Walch, 5th Feb 2011 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/1lff_v.m/
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>Pets>Cats

Now that, you know what feline diabetes is, your fears are beginning to dissipate. Now it is time for us to take a closer look at what this diagnosis means for you and your pet. It is not a death sentence for your companion. Feline diabetes can be treated and controlled. Your furry friend can live a normal life.

Caring for A Diabetic Pet Requires A High-Level of commitment.

You will have to make changes in your daily lifestyle. You may have been used to putting out food and fresh water in the morning and then giving Fluffy a quick pat on the head as you rushed out the door. Those days are history. Fluffy will require more of your time, you will have administer daily medications, feed her a proper diet and pay attention to her behavior. Your social and work life has not come to an end, but you will have to make arrangements for someone to care for her if you are going to be away for extended periods of time.

You will need to develop a close working relationship with your veterinarian. Your vet does not have to be a specialist, but if he or she is not sure about something, he or she must be willing to consult with a specialist. You will have questions from time to time, or just feel the need to discuss something with your veterinarian, so he or she must be willing to take your calls, or return your calls as soon as possible.

You must learn as much as you can about the disease because every case is different. Start with the very basics, that is what you are learning with these articles, but then continue studying on your own. If you do not understand something you read, ask your veterinarian to explain it to you. You need to understand.

Diabetes is an Expensive Disease to Treat

Initial cost: First few weeks
The initial diagnosis can be as much as $200 to $300. if you did not catch the disease in a timely manner and your beloved companion is in critical condition, the cost could be substantially higher.
The first few weeks or months are critical. Your furry friend will be making frequent trips to the veterinarian's while he gets the diabetes regulated and under control. The veterinarian's bills continue to mount up. Many veterinarians understand that these fees can exorbitant for many people and they will work with them, setting them up on a monthly payment plan. Not all veterinarians are willing or able to do this, so be sure to discuss it with the veterinarian before treatment starts.

On-Going Expenses
Once the initial diagnosis has been made, and the diabetes has been regulated, the veterinarian expenses will drop dramatically. Syringes, insulin, test strips and a prescription diet will cost between $30 to $40 per month. A glucose test meter will cost about $30 after rebates. A vial of 50 test strips will cost you about $35. a single vial will last you several months. An alternative to home monitoring is to have a blood glucose curve done at the veterinarian's office. Blood glucose curves will cost you between $100 and $150. How often you will need to test at home or have a blood glucose curve done by the vet will be established by the vet. If you test at home, you will still need to take the readings to the vet for interpretation.

Caring for A Diabetic Pet Can Be Frustrating and Stressful.

Your furry friend is like your child, and you will be concerned about causing him or her pain when you give insulin injections and when you take blood samples. The bottom line is that you will be causing him or her pain, but it is a necessary pain. Cats are very intuitive animals and they will know that you are not causing them pain because you enjoy hurting them, they will know that you are doing it because you love them.

More on the emotional aspects next time.
Part one

Part three

Feline Diabetes: Part Four Testing the Blood Glucose (BC) Levels

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Tags

Blood Glucose, Blood Sugar, Cat, Cat Care, Cat Health, Catcare, Cats, Diagnosis, Diagnostics, Feline, Feline Diabetes, Insulin, Insulin For Diabetes, Test Strips

Meet the author

author avatar Jerry Walch
Jerry Walch is a 71 year old freelance writer for hire living in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He has been writing since the late 1970s, and writes for both the print and online media. He specializes in

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Comments

author avatar Retired
5th Feb 2011 (#)

Perfect, perfect, perfect, perfect, times 1000

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author avatar Jerry Walch
6th Feb 2011 (#)

Thanks Martin.

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author avatar Mark Gordon Brown
5th Feb 2011 (#)

Martin means "purrfect".

I am very glad none of my cats have this. My wife would have to give needles if they needed any, I dont think I could.

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author avatar Jerry Walch
6th Feb 2011 (#)

Just the opposite in my home. When it came time for Jezebel to get that final shot that sent her across Rainbow Bridge, my wife ran out of the room, leaving me to hold her as she passed over.

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author avatar Denise O
9th Feb 2011 (#)

Jerry I just love this series. I agree, learn all YOU can. It is time consuming. Max had to be fed smaller meals throughout the day and I also changed his diet. As far as the shots, not me! Dan gave Max his shots and if he was out of town for work, my kids had to give him his shots. One time both the kids were gone, Dan was out of town and I had to give Max his shot, I cried the whole time. The poor doggie. When it was time to let Max go, as he had lived his life to the fullest and the time was near, our vet administered the shot. Dan held him as he passed. Jerry, I really appreciate you doing this series. So many people never even think of diabetes in animals. Well done my friend.:)

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author avatar Jerry Walch
9th Feb 2011 (#)

Thanks Denise

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author avatar Greenfaol
9th Feb 2011 (#)

Great work Jerry, another excellent article. I really hope I never need this advice for my pets xxx

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author avatar Jerry Walch
9th Feb 2011 (#)

I'm happy to see you back. email me and fill me in....please.

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author avatar Retired
10th Feb 2011 (#)

Great read...keep 'em coming.

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