Flowers for the Midwest: Gardening Made Easy

Annie Hintsala By Annie Hintsala, 30th Jan 2011 | Follow this author | RSS Feed
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>Gardening>Flowers

Perennial Flowers for Beauty and Hardiness.
Keeping an attractive yard in the mid-west portion of the United States can sometimes be a challenge. Changing weather conditions that include drought, flooding, freezing temperatures and temperatures that sometimes exceed those of Death Valley on the same day can make attractive plants hard to choose. Here are some hardy varieties that are simply beautiful and will grow year after year no matter what the weather.

The Iris



The Iris is beautiful and hardy, and it comes in a variety of colors and sizes to compliment almost any landscaping plan. They tolerate heat well, bloom in early spring and can be planted in rocky soil as well as loamy. They need some sun to bloom, but will still grow tall and green next to a house in shadow. Keep them out of watery low areas as the roots can rot if they stay too damp too long. These are such reliable plants that you can often see them growing in road side ditches, having been placed there to help keep weeds down and next to old farm houses that have long since fallen in. The iris will remain. Plant the roots in early spring or in the fall. These wonderful flowers will allow little else to grow in the area once they are established and will spread and look wonderful for years to come. Many people who favor this flower find it to be a life long favorite and are always trading for or looking for a new color, height or type. For more information look at www.irises.org the American Iris Foundation, or AIS. There are lots of links there to what grows well where and local chapters.

Purple Cone Flower

Purple Cone Flower, also known as Echinacea is a flower found growing wild in the Mid-West and is known across the globe for its healing properties. It is used to combat colds and flu and Native Americans used it for a variety of things including snakebites. It is a also quite lovely, being tall with broad, dark green leaves and delicately shade, purple, daisy like flowers. They will re-seed year after year in the same area and will usually grow from the previous year’s root system. They bloom in mid to late summer and love the sun. For more information on this lovely plant check out http://www.gardenguides.com/how-to/tipstechniques/herbs/coneflower.asp .

Daffodil

A perennial bulb that comes in a variety of shades from a deep yellow to stunning white, the daffodil is a must for anyone with a flower garden. They bloom in the early Spring and need a mostly sunny area. With very little work, these early signs of Spring will come back year after year, a tall compliment to the smaller crocus and Star of David. The greenery will quickly die down after blooming, allowing for other later blooming bulbs to be planted in the same area like tulips and late summer gladiolas. For more information look at www.daffodilusa.org The American Daffodil Society.

the Daylily

The daylily is an old fashioned favorite of many gardeners. It now comes in hundreds of varieties and as many shades and colors. Here in the Mid West they are commonly orange and dot the rural landscape with brilliant color. They generally grow best in full sun but will do alright in partial shade. They bloom in mid to late summer, often sporting multiple flowers. The great thing about daylilies is the way they grow so thick that very few weeds can find purchase in the same area. They live for years, spreading slowly and can easily be transplanted by digging up the root system. For more information check out www.daylily.com The Daylily Exchange, where you can find lots of info and links about this wonderful flower.


Whatever you choose to plant in your yard, remember to keep it natural and sustainable. Have a happy Fall planting!

Tags

Cone Flower, Day Lily, Echinacea, Flower Gardening, Flowers, Iris, Perennial

Meet the author

author avatar Annie Hintsala
I am a mommy, teacher, gardener, toy maker, illustrator, all around Jane of all trades, and a warrior princess.

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Comments

author avatar Uma Shankari
30th Jan 2011 (#)

Very useful info for all garden lovers.

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author avatar TNT_Brian
30th Jan 2011 (#)

Thanks for posting this great article. I am a gardener myself in Scotland. I love Irises, my favourite is Iris Chrysographes. Also love Hemerocalus - The Day Lily

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author avatar Mark Gordon Brown
31st Jan 2011 (#)

I am just itching for Spring, we have over 1 ft of snow, and its cccooollldd..

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author avatar Mark Gordon Brown
31st Jan 2011 (#)

I am just itching for Spring, we have over 1 ft of snow, and its cccooollldd..

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author avatar Annie Hintsala
31st Jan 2011 (#)

Just had an ice storm followed by a foot of snow and its supposed to be -15 F tomorrow night. God, I am done with winter.

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author avatar Tranquilpen
11th Mar 2012 (#)

As I am done with soaring "Death Valley" kinds of temperatures here in South Africa. I think we can all do with a bit of middle of the road kinds of weather. Thank you for sharing.

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author avatar Delicia Powers
11th Mar 2012 (#)

Wonderful,I am so hungry for gardening info, wonderful page thanks:0) can not wait for spring!

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author avatar LOVERME
28th Sep 2013 (#)

nice but the author is not to be seen now

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