For the DIY Plumber: One Size Does Not Fit All

Jerry WalchStarred Page By Jerry Walch, 4th Mar 2012 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/ohjoa8ez/
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>DIY>Plumbing

Replacing a toilet is not rocket science, even a first time DIY plumber can complete this project in less than an hours time. This article is not a guide on how to do the actual work but a guide to what you need to know in order to get the right, new toilet to replace the old toilet because one size does not fit all replacement installations.

Measure twice, make one trip to the home center.

OK, I confess, I borrowed that from all you carpenter types—Measure twice, cut once—out there in Wikinut Land, but it applies equally well the way I am using it. The very first thing that you need to do before rushing out to buy your new toilet is to measure the distance from the wall to the center of the hold-down bolts. Take this measurement at least twice, then take it again if the first two measurements are different. Getting this measurement correct is essential to having your new toilet match up with the drain hole in your bathroom floor. Write that measurement down and take it to the home center with you. Give those measurements to the sales associate and he/she will use them to assure that the toilet you choose will fit your bathroom drain.

Do not forget the new Wax Ring.

Although many people reuse old wax rings, you do not want to follow their poor example because it may result in your new toilet leaking copiously around its base. What is worse is that you may not even be aware that it is leaking for weeks until the water finally works its way through the caulking and by then that damage has already been done to the floor and framing members. Always install a new wax ring anytime you remove a toilet, even if you are replacing the same toilets. Wax rings are designed to take the shape of the drain and the trap ring on the underside of the toilet and they can only do that once. If you live in an older home and the floors are starting to sag, purchase a “Super Ring” which has increased sealing capacity. Wax rings are relatively inexpensive so if there is any doubt which ring you really need, buy the “Super Ring.”

Consider up-grading to an overflow proof toilet.

Yes, you read that correctly, an Overflow proof toilet. It is the latest thing in bathroom technology invented by two guys from the hotel industry. Your bathroom sink and bathtub has had overflow protection since the very beginning, now toilets can have it to. They are more expensive but they come with a five year warranty and they are a snap to install. Take those measurements that I mentioned above correctly and the Penguin Overflow Proof Toilet will bolt right in where the old toilet once stood.

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Tags

Diy, Diy Plumbing, Easy Diy Project, Overflow Proof Toilet, Penguin Toilets, Toilet, Toilet Overflow Problem

Meet the author

author avatar Jerry Walch
Jerry Walch is a 71 year old freelance writer for hire living in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He has been writing since the late 1970s, and writes for both the print and online media. He specializes in

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Comments

author avatar ittech
5th Mar 2012 (#)

Love this also... :)

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author avatar Jerry Walch
5th Mar 2012 (#)

Thank you Itech.

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author avatar Buzz
5th Mar 2012 (#)

Great info, Jerry. The overflow proof toilet looks interesting.

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author avatar Jerry Walch
5th Mar 2012 (#)

I just installed two of them in my beautiful od house and they actually do work as shown in the video. I tested them fully by first plugging the main trap and then the Primary Overflow outlet holes. With just the main trap plugged, the primary overflow worked ad promised. When I plugged both the main trap and the Primary Overflow Outlets, the Secondary Overflow Protection system handled the rising water with ease. They are well worth the money.

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author avatar Denise O
5th Mar 2012 (#)

Oh Jerry, I too am interested in this overflow proof toilet. We are going to be doing some renovations in the next month, down in the basement. We are thinking of adding a third bathroom downstairs, as that is now going to be the movie room hangout for the guys. Another informative DIY article my friend. As always, thank you for sharing.:)

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author avatar Jerry Walch
5th Mar 2012 (#)

Well, my friend, for you it looks as if my timing with this article couldn't have been better.

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author avatar Tranquilpen
5th Mar 2012 (#)

To start with: "Bravo Jerry! Congratulations my friend on another fine article, that, notwithstanding, In my situation as a retired Industrial Safety specialist, I have had to "eat crow" frequently in my senior years, having to make do with limited resources at my disposal. If any of my students could see me now. I live in a badly neglected Victorian home circa 1890,s and cannot find the replacement parts for the old standard fittings, couplings, washers and joints, and frequently have to "Mc Guiver-ise" (as in TV series ) some stuff, such is life, and I like it just fine, no complaints.

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author avatar Jerry Walch
5th Mar 2012 (#)

Well, Tranquilpen, your home and my home could be distant relatives, so to speak. My house was built in 1890 by Frank Waters, the artist/writer. Actually my house is not only on the Historical register here in Colorado Springs, there is a public park across the street from my house that is named in his honor as well. Anyway, I had no problem installing the Penguins, they bolted down right over the old drains. The old sewage pipes, on the other hand, do require a great deal of tender loving care.
Thank you for reading and for commenting.

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author avatar Sivaramakrishnan A
5th Mar 2012 (#)

Your DIY articles encourage people like me to just do it! Thanks Jerry, for the tips and the latest in technology - siva

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author avatar Jerry Walch
5th Mar 2012 (#)

Thank you for reading, Siva, and for your encouraging comments.

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author avatar Delicia Powers
5th Mar 2012 (#)

Thanks Jerry and well done!

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author avatar Jerry Walch
5th Mar 2012 (#)

Thank you for reading and commenting, Delicia.

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author avatar richellet
6th Mar 2012 (#)

next time I will need to replace a toilet, I am really going to pull up this article to review if it was done the right way hehehe.. great share Jerry!

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author avatar richellet
6th Mar 2012 (#)

I mean see if the plumber has done it well not really me... hehehe

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author avatar Tranquilpen
27th Mar 2012 (#)

Thank you Jerry for a useful article. will post to my facebook and twitter accounts

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author avatar John
10th Jul 2012 (#)

Sounds good, but where do you buy them in the UK

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author avatar Saurabh
19th Feb 2018 (#)

Nice Tips For sharing details.
http://www.websolutionmedia.com

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