Re-Planting More Lily of the Valley

Harold Dean Sink By Harold Dean Sink, 13th Oct 2011 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/1wb4pk3v/
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>Gardening>Planting & Growing

My experience with Lily of the Valley has grown from when I first started planting them. Researching is the key to planting anything.

Lily of the Valley

It seems pretty clear that having too many plants - especially monkey grass - in a garden can prevent other new plants from growing. At least it seemed this way for the Lily of the Valley that I planted last year.

I took great care in planning out a garden that would not only look nice, but would be fragrant as well. Near the patio was planted lily of the valley, bleeding hearts, and nasturtium.

The nasturtium was rather scraggly during the summer, but as soon as the cool climate came in the nasturtium took off. Of course, my nephews being as young as there are did not know any better and trampled every last one of them.

The bleeding hearts kept teasing me all last year with their fern like leaves as if to say, "Just be patient. We will come back next year" Yeah, well, they still are not peeking out anymore.

Then the lily of the valley began to grow from the few pips I planted. Pips? Oh, they are the little starters of new plants that are formed from roots of growing plants. Hence, lily of the valley will eventually send up pips, which will become a new plant of its own.

From what I have read, these plants can be invasive if not controlled, but they are a great border or "trail" of flowers that will scent your yard well. I have also read that one needs to separate these plants every 5 years. Personally, if they were like tulips, gladiolus and the like, I would do it every two to three years.

Something I did not know about these plants until a few days ago is that you need to soak the pips, roots and all, for up to two hours before you plant them in soil. Then you are to water the soil well, too. They like moist soil but can tolerate some heat and dry conditions as well.

Never the less, I have soaked these pips and planted them. They seem to have liked the soaking. We will see how they take to the amended garden they are planted within. Hopefully they do very well this next year.

Tags

Iris, Lily-Of-The-Valley, Planting

Meet the author

author avatar Harold Dean Sink
I do not feel that I am a professional writer, per say, but I do my best to get my point across to others. I am more of an artist, and hope in the end that will be all that I do. For now, this is me

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author avatar Funom Makama
13th Oct 2011 (#)

Informing, educating and wonderful. A complete package from a nice article. Keep it up!

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