The Bermuda Triangle

kaylarStarred Page By kaylar, 7th Dec 2011 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/40yj8o28/
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>Paranormal>Skeptics

A calm examination of the area known as the Bermuda Triangle

The Legends

There are reports of 'disappearances' in the area demarked as the "Bermuda Triangle". Whether plane or ship,

The belief that the area has some especially dangerous properties is attributed to various meteorological factors, the location of Atlantis, or extra-terrestrials.

On The Map

The Bermuda Triangle is well, a Triangle. One corner in Bermuda, one in Puerto Rico and one in Florida.

It is a large area, about half a million square miles. It marks a corridor of the north Atlantic from the West Indies along the North American seaboard as far as the Carolinas and out to Bermuda.

The Gulf Stream, an area of volatile weather passes through the Triangle as it leaves the West Indies.

Hype?

The area gained its current infamy through the efforts of Charles Berlitz in his 1974 book The Bermuda Triangle and its subsequent film adaptation.

The book recounts a long series of mysterious disappearances of ships and aircraft, in particular, the December 1945 loss of five U.S. Navy Avenger torpedo bombers in the infamous Flight 19 incident.

Flight 19

Flight 19 was the designation of five TBM Avenger torpedo bombers that disappeared on December 5, 1945 during a United States Navy navigation training flight.

The flight leader was United States Navy Lieutenant Charles Carroll Taylor. He had amassed 2,500 flying hours, mostly in aircraft of this type. His trainee pilots had about 300 hours total, 60 in the Avenger.

The pilots were US Marine Captains Edward Joseph Powers and George William Stivers, US Marine Second Lieutenant Forrest James Gerber and USN Ensign Joseph Tipton Bossi.

.

What happened?

"This is FT-74, plane or boat calling 'Powers' please identify yourself so someone can help you."

"FT-28, this is FT-74, what is your trouble?"

"Both of my compasses are out and I am trying to find Fort Lauderdale, Florida. I am over land but it's broken. I am sure I'm in the Keys but I don't know how far down and I don't know how to get to Fort Lauderdale."

At 16:45, FT-28 radioed: "We are heading 030 degrees for 45 minutes, then we will fly north to make sure we are not over the Gulf of Mexico."

During this time no bearings could be made on the flight. Taylor was told to broadcast on 4805 kilocycles. This order was not acknowledged so he was asked to switch to 3,000 kilocycles, the search and rescue frequency. Taylor replied – "I cannot switch frequencies. I must keep my planes intact."

At 16:56 Taylor was again asked to turn on his transmitter for YG if he had one. He did not acknowledge but a few minutes later advised his flight "Change course to 090 degrees (due east) for 10 minutes."

Someone in the flight said "Dammit, if we could just fly west we would get home; head west, dammit."

The weather deteriorated, radio contact became intermittent, and the five aircraft were more than 200 nmi (230 mi; 370 km) out to sea east of the Florida peninsula.

Taylor radioed "We'll fly 270 degrees west until landfall or running out of gas"

At 17:50 land-based radio stations triangulated Flight 19's position as being within a 100 nmi (120 mi; 190 km) radius of 29°N 79°W; Flight 19 was north of the Bahamas and well off the coast of central Florida.

At 18:04 Taylor radioed to his flight "Holding 270, we didn't fly far enough east, we may as well just turn around and fly east again".

The weather was bad, the sun had set.

Around 18:20, Taylor's last message was received.

"All planes close up tight ... we'll have to ditch unless landfall ... when the first plane drops below 10 gallons, we all go down together."

At the same time, in the same area, SS Empire Viscount, a British-flagged tanker, radioed that she was in heavy seas and high winds northeast of the Bahamas, where Flight 19 was about to ditch.

Closing the File?

A 500-page Navy board of investigation report published a few months later made several observations.

Taylor, although an excellent combat pilot and officer with the Navy, had a tendency to "fly by the seat of his pants," Twice during such times that he had to ditch his plane in the Pacific and be rescued.

This report was amended "cause unknown" by the Navy after Taylor's mother contended that the Navy was unfairly blaming her son for the loss of five aircraft and 14 men, when the Navy had neither the bodies nor the airplanes as evidence.

The loss of PBM-5 BuNo 59225 was attributed to a mid-air explosion.

Many other stories...

There have been a number of other stories concerning the Bermuda Triangle.

The earliest in 1812, claims that Aaron Burr's daughter was lost there, the latest, 1955 when the Connemara IV, a pleasure yacht, was found adrift in the Atlantic south of Bermuda with no one on board.

But is it true?
Is the Bermuda Triangle some kind of special place of danger?

My Practical Guide to Life

When tracking a hurricane, I rarely glance at the 'official' channels. What do they care where the storm really ends up? Does it matter to someone safe and toasty in some bunker whether the Storm comes ashore mid island or South Coast?

I matters to me; a Cat 5 which cuts through the centre of Jamaica is less dangerous than a Cat 2 which rims the South Coast. That is because I live on the South Coast and sea surges from Hurricane Dean and Ivan can and have reached 50 feet.

So I go to www.boatus.com.
Why?

Because they insure Yachts. They really care if your yacht is damaged or not. So they are very particular about telling you exactly where landfall will be made, what wind speed is, and other such items which is the difference between having to Pay for that xyz Million Dollar yacht, or having the Company picnic.

When it comes to the Bermuda Triangle, the fact that Lloyds of London does not charge a premium to ride in that specific area tells me that there hasn't been that kind of loss to make the area suspect.

If it were true, if you had a more likely chance of disappearing in the Bermuda Triangle then anywhere else, they'd charge more.

Tags

Bermuda Triangle, Disappearance, Flight 19, Lloyds Of London

Meet the author

author avatar kaylar
I am passionate about history, culture, current events, science and law

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Comments

author avatar Steve Kinsman
7th Dec 2011 (#)

Fascinating kaylar. Thank you.

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author avatar kaylar
7th Dec 2011 (#)

thanks steve

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author avatar Mark Gordon Brown
7th Dec 2011 (#)

There have not been as many reports of planes or ships missing in the Bermuda triangle as much lately as I remember hearing about when I was a kid.

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author avatar kaylar
7th Dec 2011 (#)

The fact is, if Lloyd's isn't charging more, then there is not elevated risk.

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author avatar Retired
8th Dec 2011 (#)

Wow!

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author avatar Buzz
8th Dec 2011 (#)

Fascinating indeed. Loved this mystery article. Thanks, kaylar.

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author avatar Delicia Powers
8th Dec 2011 (#)

Well done!

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author avatar kaylar
8th Dec 2011 (#)

thank you

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author avatar M G Singh
8th Dec 2011 (#)

An exciting post. Loved it

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author avatar kaylar
9th Dec 2011 (#)

you're very welcome

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author avatar عبده حمدينو ابو الروس
6th Jun 2014 (#)

I'm from Egypt
I discovered the secret of the Bermuda Triangle
I swear it

Reply to this comment

author avatar عبده حمدينو ابو الروس
6th Jun 2014 (#)

I'm from Egypt
I discovered the secret of the Bermuda Triangle
I swear it

Reply to this comment

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