The Suit of Diamonds in Cartomancy

The Divine Mr. R. By The Divine Mr. R., 8th Jun 2015 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/21-lj3jc/
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>Divination>Cartomancy

A quick guide to the meanings of the Diamond suit in cartomancy of the English tradition.

Introduction

The suit of Diamonds, as I have mentioned elsewhere, deals primarily with the exchange of information, with some news about money. If it involves news or someone hearing something through the grapevine, you can expect it to show up if a Diamond or two are in the spread. Similar to a Club card (or even a Heart card,) if a Diamond is drawn in response to a yes/no question, the answer tends to be a “yes, but…” meaning yes, but watch out for X. Whereas X is any factor that may contribute or prevent the desired outcome.

The Suit of Diamonds

King of Diamonds: Traditionally, this represents a fair man with a bit of a temper. This particular fellow may also be stubborn, and able to hold a grudge with a mind for revenge. Whether or not this is justified may be seen in the surrounding cards. He is not the unjust man of the King of Spades, but simply a man who may have had a bad turn against him.

Queen of Diamonds: This card represents a fair woman, usually meaning fair-haired (as above,) and one who is a bit of a flirt to boot. The Queen of Diamonds is typically quite fond of company of all stripes, she is really rather social and loves to be admired. If you have a lady friend who loves to be seen and goes to lengths to make sure this occurs, you probably know someone who is Queen of Diamonds. Bonus if she has blonde or light reddish hair.

Jack (or Knave) of Diamonds: Typically this represents as a close member of the inquirer’s family who always seems to put their own interests first and foremost. The Jack of Diamonds is also tends to be stubborn concerning his own opinions, rather touchy, and not might not always have his/her head screwed on straight. This can also represent the thoughts of a fair-haired individual. As before, surrounding cards are key.

Ten of Diamonds: This traditionally represents the possibility of receiving money. Specifically, this is likely to come from a husband or wife from the country (what might have been called “landed gentry” in times past) who will be bringing a fair bit of cash to the marriage. At least two children are likely, perhaps more. If this comes up for a young person who has sworn they’ll never marry, they might want to reconsider.

Nine of Diamonds: This is a context-sensitive card (but they all are, honestly.) If the card after it is a Court card, the person has a case of itchy feet, being fond of travel possibly to the detriment of him/herself. A surprise of a financial nature is also possible, or if it appears with an Eight of Spades, the surprise could turn nasty due to a dispute.

Eight of Diamonds: The Eight of Diamonds speaks primarily of a marriage later on in life. This union may be a little rocky, due to one reason or another. A clearer view may be obtained by observing the surrounding cards.

Seven of Diamonds: Like the Nine of Diamonds, the Seven of Diamonds has a few meanings. It may serve as a warning to be cautious in your actions. However, it may show the possibility of diminishing prosperity. This card may also reveal slander or toxic gossip to the inquirer.

Six of Diamonds: This card reveals the probability of marrying young and, possibly, a swift widowhood. It may also offer a warning that a second marriage may be a part of this package. Like all cards, the surrounding spread will determine what, exactly, this card may mean.

Five of Diamonds: This depends entirely upon the inquirer. If it is for a married couple, usually of a younger age, then it reveals the possibility of healthy, clever children. Otherwise, it may mean either that the inquirer will receive unexpected news, or that an entrepreneurial enterprise will be a success. The final meaning applies as much to local businesses and start-ups as it does to a corporate venture.

Four of Diamonds: The Four of Diamonds means trouble, but nothing that will be too serious. This particular card usually means that trust has been marred in some way. Trouble caused by untrustworthy friends, an enemy’s ill wishes, or generally disagreeable people who decided to make a nuisance of themselves. If it is handled well, you should come through unscathed.

Three of Diamonds: This card represents the possibility of either arguments both legal and/or domestic. Perhaps even a legal issue stemming from a domestic quarrel! Should this card come up, it is advisable for the inquirer to be extra-mindful to keep their temper. If nothing else, they will look better if it is a court-based issue. Tradition holds that this card can also act as a warning that the inquirer will marry a woman (or man) who has a bit of a temper, and domestic disputes may be a common occurrence.

Two of Diamonds: The Deuce of Diamonds warns about love being war. Basically, there is a strong likelihood of an engagement, but there will be a great deal of opposition against it. Whether or not this is justified opposition depends upon the placement of the cards. It could be secretly racist friends, could be that they see the girl (or boy) of your dreams is just a huge jackass while the inquirer is too love-struck to see otherwise, or maybe someone just wants a certain someone for themselves. Whoever gets this in their spread might want to hear out the arguments, then make a decision.

Ace of Diamonds: This card can mean one of three things (or maybe all three, given the right circumstances): A ring, money, or a letter. The surrounding cards will tell you not only what it is likely to be, but who will be doing to giving… As well as the getting.

Tags

Cartomancy, Diamonds, Divination By Cards, Fortune-Telling, Playing Card Reading

Meet the author

author avatar The Divine Mr. R.
The Divine Mr. R. is an intuitive reader, writer, and Urban Shaman from the Ohio Valley. He will be writing about divination, the paranormal, and chiming in with advice.

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