Tools and Gadgets That Every DIY Person Needs: The ProSensor 710 Electronic Stud Finder

Jerry WalchStarred Page By Jerry Walch, 6th Mar 2012 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/1ka1h9as/
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>DIY>Tools

Stud finders have come a long ways since the first, crude magnetic stud finders that detected the presence of sheet rock nails. The modern electronic stud finders were still not foolproof because they could just as easily be indicating the presence of a water pipe or electric cable as a stud. The electronic stud finder has finally come of age with the release of the ProSensor 710 Electronic Stud Finder manufactured by Franklin Sensors. This is the one stud finder that you must have.

The problem with the original magnetic stud finders.

Magnetic stud finders were state of the art, fifty years ago. The problem with them was that they were dependent upon the presence of a sheet rock nail to work. The iron nail attracted the magnet and the pointer stood straight up indicating that you were directly over the nail. Of course the magnetic stud finder would react in the same manner even if the nail was driven in the sheet rock where there was no stud. If you were trying to locate a stud in an area where no nails had been used to secure the sheet rock to a stud, the magnetic stud finder was useless. In such a situation you had to resort to tapping on the wall to find the stud.

The electronic stud finder were an improvement.

I have used many different types of electronic stud finders and they all had the same short comings. They indicated the presence of the edge of a stud, or at least what you hoped was a stud. The presence of an electrical cable or a water pipe would produce the same indication. Since the electronic stud detector only registers edges, one has no idea how wide the object actually is or where the center of the object lies. The electronic stud finder finally overcame those problems and reached perfection when Franklin Sensors introduced their ProSensor 710 Electronic Stud Finder.

The ProSensor 710 Electronic Stud Finder.

This is the one electronic stud finder that can make a rank beginner look like an expert when it comes to finding studs and hitting them with nails time after time. The ProSensor 710 not only shows you where the edges of the studs are, but indicates the full width of the stud's face. In fact, the LEDs on the ProSensor 710 are spaced in such a way that the middle LED of the three LEDs that are lit when the detector is over a stud is the center of the stud. With the ProSensor 710, it will be almost impossible not to hit a stud with the nail.

You get what you pay for.

The Franklin Sensors, ProSensor 710 costs about fifty times as much as a magnetic stud detector and three to five times as much as a standard electronic stud detector but the time you save and frustration you will avoid more than makes up what they cost. If you are serious about your DIY projects. You will want one of these stud finders in your tool kit. They also make the perfect gift if you have a tool guy or a tool gal on your gift list.

If you want a more detailed description of the the ProSensor 710 and a preview of how simple it is to use click here and download the instructions sheet for the stud finder in pdf format.

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Tags

Diy, Electronic Stud Finders, Gadgets, Magnetic Stud Finders, Nust Have, Tool Kit, Tools

Meet the author

author avatar Jerry Walch
Jerry Walch is a 71 year old freelance writer for hire living in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He has been writing since the late 1970s, and writes for both the print and online media. He specializes in

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Comments

author avatar Sheila Newton
6th Mar 2012 (#)

Something more to add to my list of Jack of all trades!!
I'm away now for 2 weeks hols. No commenting for a while - sorry!
P.S. Congrats on the star page.

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author avatar Jerry Walch
6th Mar 2012 (#)

I understand. Have a good holiday.

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author avatar Buzz
6th Mar 2012 (#)

Thanks again, Jerry, for this valuable DIY information. You're the best.

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author avatar Jerry Walch
6th Mar 2012 (#)

I'm pleased that you have found this information helpful. Personally, I have found the ProSensor worth every cent of the $99 that I paid for it. Modern construction practices call for studs to be placed either 16 inches or 24 inches on-center but when you are working on older homes, such as mine which was built in 1890, there is no telling where a stud may be and one can waste a lot of time trying to locate them without a tool like the 710. I hung some new kitchen cabinets this past weekend and the distance between the studs in my kitchen ran the gamut between being 12 inches and 20 inches on center. My ProSensor 710 has paid for itself many times over in time saved and frustration prevention.

Thanks for the read and the comments, Buzz.

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author avatar Denise O
6th Mar 2012 (#)

The ProSensor 710 electronic stud finder, is so cool. I mean, how many times have we all made a hole, thinking we heard that stud behind the wall. Love it! Thank you for sharing.:)

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author avatar Jerry Walch
6th Mar 2012 (#)

Thanks for the read and the comments, dear friend. See my comment to Buzz above.

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author avatar Songbird B
7th Mar 2012 (#)

You put so much work into these articles Jerry, and share such informative wisdom..Great Star Page as always, and you sharing your knowledge is invaluable my friend..

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author avatar Jerry Walch
7th Mar 2012 (#)

Thankyou Songbird B.

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author avatar Delicia Powers
9th Mar 2012 (#)

Great tips, thank you...

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author avatar Jerry Walch
10th Mar 2012 (#)

My pleasure,Delicia.

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