What makes the lights go on?

Amruth By Amruth, 31st Dec 2010 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/246.a.ew/
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>Science>Energy

When you turn on a light switch in the house, a light comes on. The bulb lights up because it is connected to an electric current. What is it?

What makes the lights go on?

When you turn on a light switch in the house, a light comes on. The bulb lights up because it is connected to an electric current. The electricity is supplied by a system of cables called the national grid. The advantage of a national system is that when the supply runs low in one region, it can be supplemented by power from another region. All Western Europe will soon belong to the same system.
Most of the power lines are carried by steel pylons, which are spread out across the country­side like alien giants. Some cables are laid underground.
Electricity is generated in power stations, where large amounts of fuel are needed to drive the generators. In Britain, the largest source of energy for power stations is from coal, and the second largest is oil. They share one drawback. They are fossil fuels, formed in the Earth over millions of years. They cannot be replaced and will one day run out.
In Norway nearly all electricity comes from hydro-electric power stations. They use the power of Norway's many fast-flowing rivers ('hydro' means water). But few countries can generate much electricity in this way.
A small amount of our electricity already comes from nuclear power stations. Many people are frightened of nuclear power because it makes use of a very dangerous process and, if an accident happened, thousands of people could be killed by radiation. However, nuclear power seems to be the main solution to the energy problems of the future.

Tags

Electric, Electricity, Electronic, Energy, Hydro Electric Powerplant, Hydrogen Fuel, Norway, Nuclear, Nuclear Energy, Nuclear Explosion, Nuclear Physics, Nuclear Power, Nuclear Powerplant

Meet the author

author avatar Amruth
I'm a writer. I'm good at writing. I'm writing for money. And I'm providing you a lot of information.

Share this page

moderator Mark Gordon Brown moderated this page.
If you have any complaints about this content, please let us know

Comments

Add a comment
Username
Can't login?
Password