World War One Officers

MatthewA By MatthewA, 12th Oct 2015 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/1g0xzl62/
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>History

WW1 began in 1914 after the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand. Then the European empires were dragged into a war that would last until 1918. During that war, it was the senior officers on both sides there were the most influential. These were a few of the famous military officers of the period.

Ludendorff

On the German side Ludendorff was one of the king's most notable military advisors. Ludendorff commanded not only the German armies in the East, but also their forces in Western Europe. Thus, from the outset Ludendorff soon became a hero within Germany, despite the set backs in France, as the German army won some resounding victories in its battles with the Russians.

In the West, Ludendorff threw most of Germany's forces into a final advance during 1918. This advance pushed the Entente (Britain, France and United States) armies back, but ultimately could not win a victory for the Entente. The advance ground to a halt at Marne as the Germans outran their supply lines, and with Entente reinforcements they did not possess a sufficient numerical advantage to breakthrough. At the Battle of Amiens. The Entente counter-attack shattered Ludendorff's armies as many of their troops surrendered.

Ludendorff informed the king that Germany could no longer win the war. With Germany on the brink of defeat, Ludendorff resigned. After the November armistice Ludendorff maintained that Germany had not been entirely defeated and that the Weimar Republic had betrayed the army.

Rawlinson

One of the most influential officers on the Entente's side was that of Britain's Rawlinson. After halting the German army in 1918, Rawlinson was influential in planning the Entente's counters that won them the war.

For the Battle of Amiens Rawlinson drafted what was then a revolutionary strategy to effectively combine infantry, tanks, aircraft and cavalry charges to break the German lines around the city. This combination of supporting infantry, tanks and aircraft was effective, and made some of the Entente's most substantial advances during the battle as the Germans surrendered in number. That began a general advance that would go beyond the Hindenburg Line before the November armistice.

Foch

Foch was a military hero in France. The officer first inspired France's victory at the Battle of the Marne where the French army effectively halted, and then countered, the German advance. That victory shredded Germany's original plan to defeat France.

Foch was gradually promoted during the war. In 1918, Foch once again inspired a French victory at the Marne to halt German advances in France. Then Foch emerged as Marshal of France.

When the Germans began peace talks with France, they met with Foch at his carriage within the Forest of Compiègne. It was there that Foch made it clear France's requirements for an armistice, which was duly accepted after Germany's king abdicated.

Hindenburg

Hindenburg was another of Germany's heroes. Hindenburg was an influential officer in Eastern Europe, where Germany's army was most effective. It was there that Hindenburg inspired a string of victories in battles against the Russian army, most notably the Battle of Tannenbaum. There the Germans routed a larger Russian army. At the Battle of Masurian Lakes the Germans were also victorious as the Russians began to retreat. The string of victories won vast territory for Germany in the East.

Hindenburg remained a hero in Germany despite the wartime defeat. During the Weimar period, Hindenburg later won elections for presidency and became President of the Weimar Republic. His presidency linked the former German Empire with the Weimar Republic.

Scheer

Admiral Scheer emerged as one of the German navy's most influential officers in 1916. Scheer drafted plans that outlined how Germany could potentially win the war with its navy. Those plans inspired the largest naval battle of the war, the Battle of Jutland, where much of the Imperial Germany Navy took on Britain's Grand Fleet to break its blockade. Scheer's fleet was effective during the battle, as the Royal Navy had heavier losses during the engagement. Germany celebrated victory after the battle.

But that victory was not enough to break the blockade, so Scheer switched to U-boats in 1917. Regardless of the political repercussions of unrestricted submarine warfare, Germany resumed the campaign to knock Britain out of the war. A sizeable increase in British merchant shipping followed until the Royal Navy expanded its convoy escorts. During the campaign, the United States also declared war with Germany. Only when Entente troops occupied German U-boat bases did the campaign effectively end in 1918.

Rawlinson, Hindenburg, Scheer, Foch and Ludendorff were influential officers of the war. They won some great victories for both sides on various fronts.WW1 began in 1914 after the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand. Then the European empires were dragged into a war that would last until 1918. During that war, it was the senior officers on both sides there were the most influential. These were a few of the famous military officers of the period.

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Britain, German Army, Germany, World War One

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author avatar MatthewA
Matthew is the author of the book Battles of the Pacific War 1941 - 1945. You can find further details at http://battlesofthepacificwar.blogspot.co.uk/.

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